The nature poet william wordsworth

In Lyrical Ballads, these two writers achieved something quite rare in English literature—a collaborative work of creation.

The nature poet william wordsworth

As a poet of Nature, Wordsworth stands supreme. His love of Nature was probably truer, and more tender, than that of any other English poet, before or since. Nature comes to occupy in his poem a separate or independent status and is not treated in a casual or passing manner as by poets before him.

Wordsworth had a full-fledged philosophy, a new and original view of Nature. Three points in his creed of Nature may be noted: He believed that there is a divine spirit pervading all the objects of Nature.

This belief in a divine spirit pervading all the objects of Nature may be termed as mystical Pantheism and is fully expressed in Tintern Abbey and in several passages in Book II of The Prelude.

He spiritualised Nature and regarded her as a great moral teacher, as the best mother, guardian and nurse of man, and as an elevating influence. According to him, human beings who grow The nature poet william wordsworth in the lap of Nature are perfect in every respect.

Wordsworth believed that we can learn more of man and of moral evil and good from Nature than from all the philosophies.

In this he was somewhat influenced by Rousseau. It speaks to the child in the fleeting emotions of early years, and stirs the young poet to an ecstasy, the glow of which illuminates all his work and dies of his life. A nurse both stern and kindly, she had planted seeds of sympathy and under-standing in that growing mind.

In The Prelude, he records dozens of these natural scenes, not for themselves but for what his mind could learn through. He had not sought her; neither was he intellectually aware of her presence.

With time the sensations were fixed indelibly in his memory. In Tintern Abbey, Wordsworth traces the development of his love for Nature. In his boyhood Nature was simply a playground for him.

At the second stage he began to love and seek Nature but he was attracted purely by its sensuous or aesthetic appeal. To me the meanest flower that blows can give Thoughts that do often lie too deep for tears. A sunrise for him is not a pageant of colour; it is a moment of spiritual consecration: My heart was full; I made no vows, but vows Were then made for me; bound unknown to me Was given, that I should be, else sinning greatly, A dedicated Spirit.

It is the source of some of his greatest pieces, grand rhapsodies such as Tintern Abbey. Nature Descriptions Wordsworth is sensitive to every subtle change in the world about him. He can feel the elemental joy of Spring: He can take an equally keen pleasure in the tranquil lake: The calm And dead still water lay upon my mind Even with a weight of pleasure A brief study of his pictures of Nature reveals his peculiar power in actualising sound and its converse, silence.

Being the poet of the ear and of the eye, he is exquisitely felicitious. No other poet could have written: But he is not interested in mere Nature description.

Wordsworth records his own feelings with reference to the objects which stimulate him and call forth the description.

William Wordsworth - Wikipedia

His eye was at once far-reaching and penetrating. He pored over objects till he fastened their images on his brain and brooded on these in memory till they acquired the liveliness of dreams.

He had a keen ear too for all natural sounds, the calls of beasts and birds, and the sounds of winds and waters; and he composed thousands of lines wandering by the side of a stream. But he was not richly endowed in the less intellectual senses of touch, taste and temperature.

He did not prefer the wild and stormy aspects of Nature like Byron, or the shifting and changeful aspects of Nature and the scenery of the sea and sky like Shelley, or the purely sensuous in Nature like Keats.

It was his special characteristic to concern himself, not with the strange and remote aspects of the earth, and sky, but Nature in her ordinary, familiar, everyday moods.Browse through William Wordsworth's poems and quotes.

poems of William Wordsworth. Still I Rise, The Road Not Taken, If You Forget Me, Dreams, Annabel Lee. Wordsworth, born in his beloved Lake District, was the son of . William Wordsworth was the central figure in the English Romantic revolution in poetry.

His contribution to it was threefold. First, he formulated in his poems and his essays a new attitude toward nature. William Wordsworth - Poet - William Wordsworth, who rallied for "common speech" within poems and argued against the poetic biases of the period, wrote some of the most influential poetry in Western literature, including his most famous work, The Prelude, which is often considered to be the crowning achievement of English romanticism.

William Wordsworth as a Poet of Nature: – NEOEnglish

Search in the poems of William Wordsworth: Wordsworth, born in his beloved Lake District, was the son of an attorney. He went to school first at Penrith and then at Hawkshead Grammar school before studying, from , at St John's College, Cambridge - all of which periods were later to be described vividly in The Prelude.

"William Wordsworth is the Romantic poet most often described as a "nature" writer; what the word "nature" meant to Wordsworth is, however, a complex issue. On the one hand, Wordsworth was the quintessential poet as naturalist, always paying close attention to details of the physical environment.

Mar 07,  · "William Wordsworth is the Romantic poet most often described as a "nature" writer; what the word "nature" meant to Wordsworth is, however, a complex issue.

On the one hand, Wordsworth was the quintessential poet as naturalist, always paying close attention to details of the physical environment around him (plants, animals, geography, weather).

The nature poet william wordsworth
William Wordsworth is poet of nature. Discuss | eNotes